What Motivates You at Work?

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Business leaders describe their AcuMax profiles and how their “drivers” affect them day to day.

What motivates you - driversMurray:

“I’m a high A and a high D. It helps me to be driven and move forward. D is about detail and structure. In my organization for example, we’ve got a lot of high Cs and some low Ds, so it helps me to keep everybody on track and moving forward towards the common goal, and not get sidetracked as much.”

Matt:

“I’m a highest B, which means I’m the idea guy. My ideas don’t processed in my head. Well, they process in my head and come out of my mouth at the same time. When I saw that, I chuckled because it’s true. My lowest drive is my C drive which is also accurate. I’m a juggler. I can’t do anything sequential. If you give me 10 tasks to do, I do a little bit of each one. I’ll get them all done, but not one then two. It might be one, a little bit of two, little bit of three, little bit of eight. Eventually they’ll get done. When we first did it, a little skeptical. When I saw it, I said, “This is me on paper.” It was pretty neat.”

Cathy:

“Being a highest B and knowing that I am a highest B will give me permission to be outgoing, to be an extrovert, to be someone who’s a motivator, someone who will influence others. It made it okay for me to be that person because that’s who I am.”

Deena:

“My highest driver is the B drive. It’s actually my only high, so it’s pretty significant. Communication for me and being around people is what I love to do. I’ve had different jobs in my life and this is an absolutely wonderful one. Being in a role where I am responsible for talent acquisition, as well as training and using the tools is amazing because it’s all about communication. I get to interface with people all day long.”

Kris:

“My highest drive is a C drive. I’m very patient and sequential. I can see in retrospect of how that has bit me, as well as help me to succeed in my roles.”

Will:

“My highest drive is D which means I like to be analytical, and I like to know all of the information that’s out there. I think I need to back down from that a little bit and not try and dig too much for all the information that’s out there. Move ahead I guess is what I’m trying to get at.”

Luz:

“I’m highest D. I’m the accounting supervisor, so we’re very by the book kind of people, and we want to see details and information and all those things. It allows me to be patient with others who just want bulletproof information. The owner of our company, for instance, is very low D. I’m very high D. When I want things from him, I email him and I tell him “2 things,” and then list one, two or three things. One, two, three rather than do it in sentences like a high D person with a lot of information would do. I’ve learned to adjust to other people. Not really sacrificing my high D, but making sure that when I interact with a low D person, I get across the important information I need from them.”

Randy:

“My highest driver is a B or a C. I’m a high B, high C. Not significantly high, but it did not really surprised me. I do like to talk some of the solutions out. Being an engineering firm, we get into some tough difficult problems at times. It helps for me to verbalize and come up with what I think is the right solution. Being a low A, I also like to listen to the input from other people and try to settle on what is the best solution.”

Melissa:

“I am actually a high B. I do know that I’m also a high C and D. I do communicate using this language with people around me in the workplace. Sometimes I have to say, “Okay, I’m being a high B. I just need to talk about it.” Or, “I’m on board with this. I’m a high D and I need to get the details. Please just tell me a little bit about it.” I do use that language and I do try to communicate and understand the needs of others while presenting my needs as well.”

Denise:

“I think identifying my drives tells me where I can best contribute to the team and this business. By knowing the drives of the others, I can see where they best contribute to my small marketing team.”

Ellen:

“I find that I am much more aware of my drivers and the ways in which they impact how I communicate with people around me. I notice it with my spouse, with my children, with friends and family. I notice it in terms of my tendencies when I’m talking with clients. Because I am more aware of my own tendencies and natural hardwiring, it allows me to be more effective and make adjustments as necessary so that I can match other people’s profiles more effectively, communicate with them more effectively.”

To learn more about how the AcuMax Index® can help your organization to identify and match highly-motivated candidates with the perfect employment position, we invite you to Contact Us or call us today at 844-228-6291.

The AcuMax Index is helping organizations of all sizes to hire with confidence, dramatically increasing retention and improving performance.

Jay Hawreluk

James “Jay” Hawreluk, is the author of "Unraveling the Mystery of People" and creator of the AcuMax Index, the only assessment that measures and reports on human natural wiring. People have always fascinated him, and over the years, Jay has developed AcuMax as a process to understand "why" people do the things they do.

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